Pilot projects

A small grants program to encourage new ideas and also used to recruit new members.

Translational Research

 

Because defining the term “Translational Research” can be a moving target, it is useful to define the concept of translational research in environmental health sciences that is guiding efforts at SWEHSC, illustrated schematically in this figure.

This scheme highlights three broad areas of translational research: experimental models, human studies, and stakeholders.

In addition to defining these areas and their components, this figure illustrates the levels at which research translation needs to occur.

Directions for the Application Process

Application Description

Pilot projects are designed to provide support for obtaining preliminary data that can be used in developing major proposals for submission to extramural funding agencies.

Components of the application, by November 9, 2012, 5:00 pm:

Chronic Administration of 10ppb arsenic in the drinking water results in dysregulation of glucose metabolism

 

Investigators

Richard Vaillancourt, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Pharmacology/Toxicology

and

Heddwen Brooks, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Physiology

 

Amount of funding received:

$40,000

Description:

In a recent study, we demonstrated that chronic administration of 10 ppb arsenic in the drinking water results in dysregulation of glucose metabolism. This concentration of arsenic is environmentally relevant and humans are very likely to be exposed to arsenic in their drinking water at similar doses. In our mouse study, elevated levels of glucose were detected in both blood and urine and abnormally high levels of insulin were detected in serum.

Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and adverse effects on Human Health

 

Investigators

Catharine L. Smith, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Pharmacology and Toxicology

Amount of funding received:

$40,000

Description:

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups from proteins. Small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes have shown promise in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents, especially when used against hematologic malignancies. However, some environmental xenobiotics have HDAC-inhibiting activity and may act as endocrine disruptors with adverse effects on human health. It is currently difficult to predict and monitor tumor response to HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as well as determine environmental exposures that have a significant impact on cellular function.

Environmental exposure to inorganic arsenic in women

 

Investigators

Zhao Chen, Ph.D., MPH
Professor
Public Health – Epidemiology and Biostatistics
 

Amount of funding received:

$40,000

Description:

Environmental exposure to inorganic arsenic is an indisputable source of increased risk of several human cancers and chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and diabetes. Despite a lack of clear understanding of arsenic-induced toxicity, arsenic has multiple adverse effects including an increase in inflammatory markers.

Epigenetic Signatures of Prenatal Farm Exposures

 

Investigators

Donata Vercelli, MD
Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy
College of Medicine
Member of Arizona Respiratory Center and BIO5

Amount of funding received:

$40,000

Description:

The Research

Environmental Arsenic Exposure, Lung Remodeling and Severity of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

 

Investigators

Jefferey Burgess, MD, MPH
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health
College of Public Health

Amount of funding received:

$40,000

Description:

The Research

Fn14-driven angiogenesis in human non-small cell lung cancer

 

Investigators

George S. Watts, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor
Pharmacology/Arizona Cancer Center

Amount of funding received:

$39,037

Description:

Read about Dr. Watts

Biomarkers of Glyco-Oxidative Stress and Susceptibility to Diabetic Complications

   

Investigators

Craig Stump, M.D., Ph.D
Associate Professor of Medicine
Chief Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension

and

Serrine S. Lau, Ph.D.
Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy
Director of SWEHSC

Amount of funding received:

$40,000

Description:

Drs. Stump and Lau jointly submitted a Pilot Project that had several strengths including clinical translation, laboratory mentoring and recruitment of a clinician scientist, utilization of a local population that is at greater risk, use of novel proteomic techniques, and the relevance of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) to the emerging interests of Center members. T2D is an excellent model of how environmental factors interacting with susceptible genes lead to poor clinical outcomes.

Microbial Communities in Induced Sputum in Relation to Asthma Status and Associated Exposures

 

Investigators

Pradeep Reddy Marri, Ph.D.
BIO5 Institute

Amount of funding received:

$40,000
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