Community Environmental Concerns

Asthma and Air Pollutants Discussed in New Video

News Date: 
March 12, 2017 :00am
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Today, the IAQ Video Network and Cochrane & Associates announced the release of their latest educational video.  Their newest production discusses asthma and common asthma triggers that impact close to 25 million Americans with the condition

Fireside Chat: The John Merck Fund’s Ruth Hennig on Environment and Health in the Trump Administration

News Date: 
March 24, 2017 :00am
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What do you think the 2016 US Presidential election results mean for environmental health over the coming four years? What might be the impact on research funding and priorities? Chemical regulation? Children’s health? Community health?

Low-Income Kids More Likely to Have ADHD, Asthma

News Date: 
February 14, 2017 :00am
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A recent study has suggested that family income and access to health insurance play a large role in a child’s physical and mental health. In fact, it has been found that children in families struggling to make ends meet are developing asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at faster rates than kids from families with greater means. This is likely because children in financially struggling families are more likely to be exposed to poorer indoor and outdoor air quality, and are less likely to eat well—which only increases asthma risks.

Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

News Date: 
February 10, 2017 :00am
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Within the past four decades, the presence of diabetes has more than quadrupled in the United States. In fact, it is predicted that by the year 2050, one-third of Americans will have contracted diabetes if no preventative actions are taken. Research has recently shown that poor air quality contributes to the development of obesity and diabetes in children—particularly Hispanic children. Due to childhood exposure to heightened levels of air pollution, Hispanic children are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. 

Water Contamination

News Date: 
October 11, 2016 :00am
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Over the past few decades, the increase in population and advances made in farming technology has increased the demand for crops and livestock from the agricultural industry. This growth in agricultural production has resulted in an increase in contaminants polluting soil and waterways. The increase in contaminants has prompted efforts to reduce the amount of pollutants in waterways in order to improve overall water quality.

Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

News Date: 
February 1, 2017 :00am
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 Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia.

Toxins in Your Fast-Food Packaging?

News Date: 
February 1, 2017 :00am
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 You've probably wondered whether your McDonald's cheeseburger or Taco Bell burrito contains harmful toxins. While this is likely a prevalent fear that comes from ordering within the fast-food industry, what you probably haven't considered is that the wrapper that covered your burrito, or the box that contained your burger, might also harbor these damaging toxins. In fact, a recent study has found that grease-resistant fast-food wrappers and boxes contain potentially harmful chemicals that can leach into food.

Kids' Asthma Flareups Fall Off After No-Smoking Laws

News Date: 
January 9, 2017 :00am
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In the United States, over 7 million children have contracted asthma, and tobacco is a commonly known agent that triggers many of these cases. However, due to recent indoor smoking bans that communities have started to adopt, there have been fewer and fewer cases of asthma flare-ups in children. In fact, studies have show that within 20 metropolitan areas that prohibited smoking in a public area (such as restaurants and hotels), the number of kids' asthma-related ER visits has decreased by over 17 percent and still continues to fall.  

Airway Differences May Explain Why Asthma Can Be More Serious for Blacks

News Date: 
January 13, 2017 :00am
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Asthma has long been a chronic lung disease that has plagued its fair share of individuals. However, a recent study has shown that black people are more susceptible to this disease than the average white man/woman. Although access to health care and living conditions are a factor, they aren’t entirely responsible for this anomaly. Researchers have found that differences in airway inflammation plays a huge role in a patient’s response to treatments, and these differences can be found to vary from race to race—particularly for African-Americans.

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