Tuba City and Shonto high school students among 45 top Arizona students in UA science labs this summer

  Reported in the Hopi Tutuveni

 

Tucson, Ariz. – Seven students from Tuba City and Shonto high schools are among the 45 interns enrolled in a seven-week summer science program at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The KEYS (Keep Engaging Youth in Science) program began June 2, runs through July 18, and includes students from 24 high schools.

 

       Faith Curley is working in the lab of Catharine Smith, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology for the College of Pharmacy. Their project involves studying the effect of drugs on RNA, specifically in the area of lymphoma cancer.

Maya Begay is working in the lab of Melanie Culver, assistant professor of wildlife and fisheries sciences for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Their project involves studying DNA from animal scat to determine the type of animal and their diet, which is useful in helping to save endangered species.

 

       Eversito Harrison III is working in the lab of Pak Kin Wong, associate professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering for the College of Engineering. Their project involves 3D printing and biosensors. Keane Sullivan is working in the lab of Judith Bronstein, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Their project involves investigating why the datura plant does not protect itself against the hawk moth.

 

       Jazmin Greyeyes is working in the lab of Roger Miesfeld, profes- sor of chemistry and bio- chemistry for the College of Science. Their project involves studying how the eggs and ovaries of Anopheles Stephansi (mosquitoes) develop.

Deion Cling is working in the lab of Shane Snyder, professor of chemical and environmental engineering for the College of Engineering. Their project involves studying how perfluorinated chemicals contaminate water and what effect this has on humans.

Venecia Yazzie is working in the lab of Leif Abrell, associate research scientist of chemistry and soil, water and environmental science for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Their project involves testing water samples from wells near Mexico for chemicals.

 

       The Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center (SWEHSC), located in the UA College of Pharmacy, and the BIO5 Institute co-direct the KEYS internship program. This is the eighth summer the program has been presented. With

this session, 233 Arizona teens have contributed to research projects across the university. This year, faculty in bioscience, bio- engineering and environmental health sciences are participating.

 

Students’ internship experiences include a week-long training institute and research under the mentorship of UA investigators and graduate students. Interns also attend weekly seminars to discuss their experiences and practice science communication skills. Their work will cul- minate in presentations to their peers and the public in a poster session July 18.

 

       The skills and techniques learned in the pro- gram are enhanced by the opportunity to network with others who share an enthusiasm for science: fellow high school stu- dents, UA undergraduate students, faculty and other mentors.

“KEYS is a wonder- ful opportunity for high school students to see what science is all about,” says Marti Lindsey, SWE- HSC community outreach and education director, and KEYS co-director.

 

       “The program gives them hands-on experience in conducting a scientific experiment and communicating the results.”

Learn more about KEYS: http://keys.pharmacy.arizona.edu