Asthma

Asthma and related allergic diseases are two conditions that plague many Americans across the Southwest. Native Americans across the desert landscape have suffered from these ailments in disproportionate amounts. Understanding how particular environments can either contribute to, or offer protection from asthma offer the promise of improving treatment for asthma and allergy patients.


IHSFC Data Science Resource

The IHSFC Data Science Resource (IHSFC DSR) provides expertise throughout the life-cycle of a research project, from study design and sample collection planning, through the publication and dissemination of results, to data sharing and reuse through curated repositories.

To learn more about the IHSFC DSR click here


Contaminated Water

Scientists test for arsenic and other heavy metals in water collected from the Gold King Mine spill. 

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Environmental Impact on Reproductive Health

The adverse effects of environmental exposures on the reproductive system have been recognized as significant threat to human health.   The center now counts with expertise in descriptive and mechanistic reproductive toxicology (Craig) and the reproductive and gynecological health epidemiology (Farland).

Read more here.


Dust Storms

Monsoon storms send huge walls of dust across parts of Arizona, sometimes snarling traffic on roadways and knocking out power. There could be hidden health impacts for millions of people living in the state's dust zone as well. These dust storms carry a noxious mix of fungi, heavy metals from pollutants, chemicals and bacteria that could lead to cardiovascular and eye disease, and other illnesses.  These large dust storms are often called haboobs and in the local Native American communities they are called jegos (joo-goes).


Steps 2 STEM

The Steps 2 STEM Summer Research Internship is a 4-week research experience for students participating in the Pima County JTED's Bioscience and Health Science programs.

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UV Exposure

Arizona has one of the highest incidence rates of skin cancer, the most prevalent cancer, in the United States.

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A Student's Journey

A Student's Journey is a year long program with a 5 week on campus experience at the University of Arizona for participating Tohono O'odham Community College (TOCC) students.

"Ñia, Oya G T-Ttacui Am Hab E-Ju:" "Our Dream Fulfilled"


To learn more click here


KEYS Program

​The KEYS internship provides hands-on research opportunities to talented students from diverse backgrounds. The program concludes with the KEYS Research Showcase, where students present their results to their families, UA scientists, and program sponsors.

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Cellular Imaging

The Cellular Imaging Resource provides SWEHSC members and their labs with access to a number of powerful microscopes and image analysis capabilities. The Resource staff provides hands-on assistance with experimental design, training, troubleshooting, and analysis.

More about the Cellular Imaging Resource.


IHSFC Human Populations and Exposure Resource

The IHSFC Human Populations and Exposure Resource (HPER) leverages SWEHSC human studies and exposure assessment experts to provide a central resource for researchers conducting environmental health studies.

To learn more about the IHSFC HPER click here


Tribal Communities

Native American reservation land comprises more than 25% of the state of Arizona, which is home to 22 distinct tribes and one of the largest percentages of Native Americans in the United States.

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Smoke Exposure

Cancer is a leading cause of death among firefighters, who are exposed to cancer-causing chemicals through both inhalation and skin absorption. Measuring these exposures and determining the mechanisms by which they cause cancer are essential steps in learning how to reduce cancer risk in firefighters. 

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Mine Tailings

Tailings are the mounds of crushed rock, mixed with trace amounts of chemicals, that remain after ore is processed. Mine tailings are composed of fine particles that can easily be blown around in dust storms and can lead to contaminated well water.


Indigenous Stewards Vol. 4

This magazine follows in the tradition of story-telling which our ancestors have used for generations to pass down knowledge. Stories from Indigenous students and young professionals across The University of Arizona and various other entities shared their stories with the hopes of inspiring younger generations.

Click here to read magazines


Gold King Mine

In August 2015, an estimated 3 million gallons of acid water and heavy metals spilled from the Gold King Mine into Colorado's Animas River, eventually flowing into the San Juan River, the primary source of irrigation for Navajo Nation farmers. The spill was accidentally caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency while trying to prevent leakage of toxic materials.

Click here to read more


  • AZ HEROES is a collaborative project between the AZ HEROS (Arizona Healthcare, Emergency Response, and Other Essental workers Surveillance) Study at the University of Arizona and Tribal Communities that are concerned for the wellbeing of their essential worker's health related to getting or re-getting COVID-19. Visit our webpage here
  • The Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center (SWEHSC) is a collaborative and interdisciplinary research center, which is actively investigating the health effects of environmental agents and serving as a resource for the community. Welcome message from our Center Director.
  • The SWEHSC offers Pilot Project grants twice per year. To get more information go to the Pilot Projects page. Contact Dean Billheimer, Deputy Director for more information.